There’s Reason to Pay Attention to the Dodgers Today


Despite coming back from a 2-0 deficit, the Dodgers lost to the Giants yet again on Tuesday, meaning… well, it doesn’t really matter, does it? The game-by-game exploits of the 2011, most of which end in failure, are hardly as important as they once were. Sure, a three-run second inning is nice, though when it comes in a game where the club manages just five hits, chances are it won’t end happily. That’s too bad for Rubby De La Rosa, who continued his excellent progression by getting through five innings without a single walk, though giving up nine hits in that time isn’t exactly great. (I had to laugh when I saw the box score, however; yes, Hong-Chih Kuo was awful in allowing the winning runs, but I know a lot of people will see “three walks in 0.2 innings!” and freak out – two of the three were intentional jobs).

Oh, and Andre Ethier sat thanks to a sore knee. So there’s that.

Still, there’s a lot of good reasons to pay attention to the Dodgers today. On the field, Clayton Kershaw tries to avoid the sweep when he faces off against Tim Lincecum in a marquee matchup this afternoon. You can most likely expect a 1-0 game that’s over in 2 hours and 10 minutes, though with the twisted sense of humor in the universe being the way it is, I’d say a 12-10 slugfest isn’t completely out of the question either. Kershaw historically owns the Giants; in nine career starts, he’s allowed just ten earned runs in 55.2 IP, and has a 60/16 K/BB mark. This will be the fourth time he’s seen them this year; he dominated in the first two (7 shutout innings on Opening Day, beating Lincecum, 6.2 scoreless on April 11) before running into trouble the third time (4 ER in 5 IP on May 18).

Of course, the fun is hardly restricted to baseball today. Before the game even gets going, the bankruptcy lawyers will be hard at work in a Delaware courtroom, and Josh Fisher of DodgerDivorce explains why in a piece over at ESPNLA:

On Wednesday, Judge Kevin Gross will decide whether McCourt can shepherd the Dodgers through their bankruptcy using McCourt-arranged financing. In McCourt’s favor is the strong deference bankruptcy courts usually show debtors who secure their own financing. Working against him is Major League Baseball’s proposal to fund the team’s operations at a much lower cost. Coupled with allegations of McCourt mismanagement, baseball could increase its influence on the Dodgers by convincing the court to deny McCourt his own financing.

Gross’ ruling on the issue has two layers of importance. First, from a technical standpoint, forcing McCourt to accept MLB financing paves the way for Selig to exert control over the Dodgers should McCourt fail to follow baseball’s terms. Second, because of the great deference typically shown debtors to exercise their own business judgment in these scenarios, a ruling against McCourt would be a strong message that Gross lacks faith in McCourt’s ownership. A pro-MLB decision Wednesday would not end the McCourt era, but it would be a damaging blow.

I have little inside info here, but fromwhat I’ve gathered, it seems that MLB has a slight edge here, since the cost of their loan is so much less than McCourt’s privately gained one. That’s the way we should be rooting, anyway. Hey, remember when we were just baseball fans?

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  1. [...] Earlier today, I wrote this, regarding Clayton Kershaw‘s history against San Francisco: Kershaw historically owns the Giants; in nine career starts, he’s allowed just ten earned runs in 55.2 IP, and has a 60/16 K/BB mark. This will be the fourth time he’s seen them this year; he dominated in the first two (7 shutout innings on Opening Day, beating Lincecum, 6.2 scoreless on April 11) before running into trouble the third time (4 ER in 5 IP on May 18). [...]

  2. [...] scoreless innings against San Diego on July 9, and then didn’t walk a single Giants on July 19. In the midst of that stretch, we started wondering about how many innings the Dodgers should let [...]