So How’s Your Week Been, Adrian Gonzalez?

At the end of April, Adrian Gonzalez was hitting .333/.398/.473 and proving himself to be a bright spot of the increasingly dark 2013 season, as well as teaming with Carl Crawford & Nick Punto to show that 75% of the Boston quartet has been worth it so far.

On May 1, he hit his third homer of the year, a shot off Colorado’s Juan Nicasio. How’s his month gone since then?

Wednesday, 5/1: Following his homer, Gonzalez tried to snag a double down the line and, well, this happened:

Thursday: team day off

Friday: in starting lineup, scratched before game time. Jerry Hairston played first.

Saturday: in starting lineup, scratched before game time. Hairston played first.

Sunday: in starting lineup, scratched before game time. Juan Uribe(!) played first. Gonzalez pinch-hit, driving in two with a single, in the eighth inning.

Monday: plays a full game against Arizona, going 2-4. He also treated us to some famous last words:

per Dylan Hernandez — Gonzalez plans to play through the pain of his mild strain, skipping batting practice so he doesn’t aggravate it. He’s actually actively saying he hopes he doesn’t have to dive for a ball. A ballplayer pushing through pain? Such a thing has never ended poorly, ever.

He hopes he doesn’t have to dive for a ball? I’m sure that won’t be relevant information.

Tuesday: plays a full game against Arizona, going 1-4.

Wednesday: starts, and doubles in two plate appearances before leaving in the fifth inning, right after… diving for a ball:

The Dodgers, mercifully, are off today.

What will Friday bring?

“I’ll be ready to go Friday,” he said.

Of course he will.

2012 Dodgers in Review #5: 1B Adrian Gonzalez

(w/ LA) .299/.344/.463 157pa 3hr 0.8 WAR C+

2012 in brief: Shocking trade brought Gonzalez & friends to Los Angeles in August and changed the face & direction of the franchise.

2013 status: Will make $21m and will be the Dodger first baseman until long after this blog ceases to exist.

******

For months, we suffered through James Loney. We bristled at the idea that Juan Rivera was actually any sort of alternative. We regretted that Kevin Youkilis landed in Chicago. We worried that even when Loney was gone, there was just about nothing on the first base market this winter to finally solve this problem.

Then, as it always seems to happen, news broke while I was on the road (to Boston, no less). Since the deal took a few days to shake out, I managed to eke out some thoughts from a hotel room:

As some of you know, I’m in Boston this weekend for a college friend’s wedding, and as you can imagine, running into  so many Red Sox fans last night meant that we had much to discuss. The question I got most of all was, “so do you like this for the Dodgers?”

The more I think about it, the more difficult that question is to answer. My reactionary post last night was mostly done in the giddiness of the moment (Kemp/Ethier/Gonzalez/Ramirez!), and for 2012, I love the hell out of it. Salary concerns are mostly irrelevant over the remaining six weeks of the season, and none of the players going to Boston were likely to contribute to a 2012 playoff push; James Loney, if anything, was doing his best to hinder it. So for this season, what you’ve done is hugely upgrade at first base and add another starting pitcher, which now seems more timely given the concerns over Chad Billingsley’s elbow.

<snipped a whole bunch of thoughts about prospects headed back to Boston>

So how am I feeling about it today? I think Gonzalez is going to be an incredible fit in LA, especially considering that reports of his demise in Boston seem overblown (he was outstanding last year and has been very good for much of this year after a slow start) and that he never seemed to want to leave Southern California in the first place. It’s a high price to pay, but if he is what we think he is – and don’t forget, there was little available in the first base market next year, so if you’re spending money, this is how you do it – and the team becomes a consistent contender, I think it’ll be a price we can live with.

And if not? The next decade could get ugly, fast. For now, I’m cautiously optimistic, but mainly excited for the rest of the season.

Things certainly got off to a good start; in Gonzalez’ first game as a Dodger, Mark Ellis, Luis Cruz, & Matt Kemp led off the bottom of the first inning with hits. Gonzalez, coming to the plate for the first time in blue, crushed a Josh Johnson pitch deep into the stands, needing only a single swing to hit more homers at Dodger Stadium than Loney had in 2012. (Still can’t believe that’s a real thing, by the way.) A week later, his first walkoff turned a deficit into a win against Arizona, and things seemed like they’d be rosy.

It’s never quite that simple, of course. Despite my attempts to remind people that the huge trade was made with far more than 2012 in mind, as the offense continued to struggle – largely, I would add, because Shane Victorino was terrible, A.J. Ellis was running out of gas, and Kemp was a shell of himself after hitting that wall in Colorado – Gonzalez found himself the target of a sizable amount of criticism.

That’s to be expected, of course. You make one of the riskiest and most expensive trades in sports history, and you expect the centerpiece to come in and be productive. After an 0-5 against St. Louis on September 16, Gonzalez was hitting a lowly .233/.287/.372 as a Dodger, which was Loney-esque in its mediocrity. As I mentioned, he was hardly alone in struggling at the time, since just about every Dodger outside of Cruz was, but as the big-ticket import, he was the one in the crosshairs.

Fortunately for Gonzalez, that’s not how things ended. He picked up three hits in a doubleheader against Washington on September 19, then one in each of his next three games before going deep twice in Cincinnati on September 23, his first two homers since that first game. By the time the season was over, Gonzalez had hit .390 over a season-long 15 game hitting streak, and totaled .319/.360/.474 during the month September.

By September 28, I found myself having to hit back against the constant criticism of Gonzalez and the trade:

As I attempt to catch up on the baseball world after the whirlwind last few weeks of wedding and honeymoon, what I’m noticing is that there’s a pretty great narrative going on about how the big Dodgers/Red Sox trade, and Adrian Gonzalez specifically, was “a bust” for LA, since Gonzalez got off to a slow start and the team is unlikely to make the playoffs. (You can see examples here. And here. And here. And here. And here. And here. And probably dozens more.)

While that’s kind of silly – we talked about how the trade was made with far more than just 2012 in mind and anyone who quotes the entire $250m+ figure without pointing out that it was hardly a secret that Carl Crawford was known to be injured when the trade was made is willfully distorting the facts – I will at least acknowledge that Gonzalez hasn’t exactly been the instantaneous boost we all hoped he’d be.

Then again, he is hitting .311/.357/.459 over his last 22 games, dating back to September 2, while James Loney, somewhat remarkably, has been even worse in Boston than he was as a Dodger. So with Crawford irrelevant and Josh Beckett adequate, it’s hard for me to pin too much blame on this team (likely) missing October on some perceived story about how the big-spending Dodgers swung and missed with their big deal, especially when first base was upgraded and the rotation was reinforced.

I went on to note nearly a dozen different reasons that had more bearing on missing the playoffs than Gonzalez, from injuries to Kemp & Chad Billingsley to the aforementioned slumps by Victorino & Ellis to the mere fact that the Giants somehow lost Melky Cabrera and then played better.

All of which leaves us with some very disparate and difficult-to-reconcile facts about Gonzalez:

1) A Dodger line of .297/.344/.441 (.785 OPS) is by no means a disaster, especially when you consider that it includes his slow first two weeks, and is clearly an upgrade over Loney
2) A .785 OPS is hardly what you are paying hundreds of millions for
3) Gonzalez wasn’t the reason the Dodgers missed the playoffs, but he didn’t propel them there, either.

For his part, Gonzalez acknowledged that he has work to do and expectations to meet in a post-season interview with Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times, but generally sounded happy and excited to be in Los Angeles. For now, the hot end to Gonzalez’ season was encouraging, and it’s hard not to be thrilled that he’ll be manning first base next year instead of Loney, Bryan LaHair, or whatever other unlikeable alternatives are to be available. That’s really an underrated component of the trade, I think. I’m only half joking when I say that Loney is potentially the best free agent first baseman out there (assuming the Nationals lock up Adam LaRoche first), so to be able to avoid that mess with a guy who has been one of the best for years… well, it certainly alleviates a lot of concern headed into 2013. Now all we need is for Gonzalez to show it on the field.

******

Next up! We take a total left turn to provide a grade to someone you wouldn’t expect…

Criticism of Gonzalez Trade Missing the Mark

As I attempt to catch up on the baseball world after the whirlwind last few weeks of wedding and honeymoon, what I’m noticing is that there’s a pretty great narrative going on about how the big Dodgers/Red Sox trade, and Adrian Gonzalez specifically, was “a bust” for LA, since Gonzalez got off to a slow start and the team is unlikely to make the playoffs. (You can see examples here. And here. And here. And here. And here. And here. And probably dozens more.)

While that’s kind of silly – we talked about how the trade was made with far more than just 2012 in mind and anyone who quotes the entire $250m+ figure without pointing out that it was hardly a secret that Carl Crawford was known to be injured when the trade was made is willfully distorting the facts – I will at least acknowledge that Gonzalez hasn’t exactly been the instantaneous boost we all hoped he’d be.

Then again, he is hitting .311/.357/.459 over his last 22 games, dating back to September 2, while James Loney, somewhat remarkably, has been even worse in Boston than he was as a Dodger. So with Crawford irrelevant and Josh Beckett adequate, it’s hard for me to pin too much blame on this team (likely) missing October on some perceived story about how the big-spending Dodgers swung and missed with their big deal, especially when first base was upgraded and the rotation was reinforced.

Besides, there’s no shortage of real reasons why this team isn’t going to make the playoffs, and Gonzalez being “good but not great” barely sniffs the list for me. Even just over the last two months, you can see a variety of causes why the Dodgers are probably going to be sitting and watching from home:

1) The Giants have somehow become one of baseball’s most surprising teams, even after losing Melky Cabrera, and might win 95 games. (You know I don’t care about PEDs nearly as much as most other people, but someone tell me how Marco Scutaro is really hitting .361/.384/.476 as a Giant, please.)
2) Clayton Kershaw got hurt and has been semi-available
3) Matt Kemp has been constantly banged-up and unproductive while trying to play through injury
4) Chad Billingsley was lost for the season, which combined with Kershaw’s woes prompted Don Mattingly to admit that Beckett might be his best starter without a trace of irony
5) A.J. Ellis has run out of gas in his first season as a starter, hitting only .187/.271/.267 over the last month
6) Kenley Jansen missed more time with concerns over his heart condition
7) Shane Victorino, someone we liked only in the small sense that he wasn’t Bobby Abreu, has been absolutely atrocious
8) After a good start to his Dodger career, Hanley Ramirez has slumped badly, hitting .234/.274/.378 over the last month
9) Finally, and perhaps more relevant to the season as a whole, the miraculous April start unreasonably inflated expectations. Remember April, when a healthy Kemp was destroying the world and every Ivan De Jesus or Matt Treanor or Tony Gwynn was somehow chipping in with a game-winning hit? That was never going to keep up, and it didn’t. The Dodgers were 24-11 on May 14; held back by a slew of injuries and inevitable regression, they are 57-64 since, and that’s a lot closer to what we expected at the start of te year.

Those are just nine reasons; there’s certainly many others, and while Gonzalez’ failure to hit like Miguel Cabrera times Mike Trout plus Josh Hamilton certainly contributed, any of these hysteric reactions you see to the “failed” trade being the main reason why a flawed, injury-destroyed team missing its best starting pitchers probably not making the playoffs is just completely missing the mark.

Dodgers Narrowly Escape With 3-2 Win

Maybe it’s just the residue of the last week or so, but even when today’s game was tied at 2 after eight innings, it still felt like “same old, same old”. Adrian Gonzalez & Andre Ethier were hitless again, and even the two runs the Dodgers had scored hardly felt like signs of offensive dominance, coming as they did on a sacrifice fly and a wild pitch. While Chris Capuano had been far from overwhelming, he’d been good enough, and so the Dodgers entered the ninth even.

Still, I’m having a hard time saying there was a lot of optimism around. Ronald Belisario looked shaky in the eighth and hadn’t escaped easily, and with the way the Giants have been pulling magic out of every orifice lately, how easily was it to forecast a San Francisco walkoff win? They’d take the series, put something close to a dagger into the divisional hopes of the Dodgers, and the angry mobs would start burning Gonzalez in effigy.

How else could it end?

For once… in happiness. Gonzalez led off the ninth with a triple (!) to deep right, his first of the year. Well, okay, even blind squirrels find that nut, but as we learned yesterday against Tim Lincecum, even when the Dodgers do get men in scoring position, they’ve had difficulty stringing anything together. But not today: Hanley Ramirez followed with a double, giving the Dodgers a 3-2 lead that they’d turn into a 3-2 win.

That’s not to say it ended easily, because Ramirez & Andre Ethier each ran into outs on the bases following the run, and Alex Castellanos nearly turned a deep fly to left into an inside-the-park homer for Gregor Blanco in the bottom of the ninth. (It ended up as a double.) But Brandon League, wonderful Brandon League, continued his excellent run in filling in for Kenley Jansen to hold it down in the ninth.

I don’t know if winning two out of three in this series will be enough. I do know that Clayton Kershaw on ESPN Sunday Night Baseball tomorrow night makes for appointment television.

Adrian! First LA Walkoff Ends Series On a High Note

See Adrian Gonzalez in the picture above? That’s him about to swing at a pitch from J.J. Putz in the bottom of the ninth. Five seconds before this moment, Gonzalez was in the midst of another tough game, one that was magnified by the fact that the suddenly feeble Dodger offense was about to go down to another loss, one which would have put them a season-high 5.5 games out in the NL West. Even the double the box score showed for him was a ball that should have been caught had a sunny sky not caused outfielders Chris Young & Justin Upton to stare blankly at each other as it dropped in. Yet another loss with yet another lack of offense, other than Matt Kemp‘s solo homer, and there’s no telling how ugly things may have gotten around here.

Five seconds after? Well, after the much-maligned Mark Ellis & Shane Victorino slid across the plate to turn a 4-3 loss into a 5-4 win, Gonzalez was mobbed by teammates after his first LA walk-off, and suddenly all seemed right in the world. Amazing how much things can change in just a few seconds, isn’t it? Suddenly, you hope that this team has momentum instead of heading down the tubes, and the timing couldn’t be better: after three games with San Diego starting tomorrow, the Giants are the next up. Safe to say, that series is going to be as big as they come.

But most importantly, was Todd Coffey excited?

Hey, me too.