The Needle And The Damage Done: Bonds* Not Coming Back To SF In 2008

The Giants have scheduled a major press conference at 5 P.M., but at 4:44 P.M., MSTI will break the story to you first!

Per Barry’s website, he will not be returning to the Giants next year. From Barry himself, in a surprisingly nice letter to the fans…

September 21, 2007

Dear Fans,

This journal will be one of my last entries as a San Francisco Giant. Yesterday, I was told by the Giants that they will not be bringing me back for the 2008 season. During the conversation with Peter McGowan I was told that my play this year far exceeded any expectations the Giants had, but that the organization decided this year would be my last season in San Francisco. Although I am disappointed, I’ve always said baseball is a business — and I respect their decision. However, I am saddened and upset that I was not given an earlier opportunity to properly say goodbye to you, my fans, and celebrate with the city throughout the season as I truly believe this was not a last minute decision by the Giants, but one that was made some time ago. I don’t have nor do I want any ill feelings towards the organization, I just wish I had known sooner so we had more time to say our goodbyes and celebrate the best 15 years of my life.

I consider the City of San Francisco and you, the fans, my family. Thank you for loving me and supporting me throughout all the highs and lows. I feel a deep connection with you as I have grown up with all of you since the days my dad first became a Giant. The Bay Area has loved my family and friends for so many years and I thank you for that. It is now a time for change, as many athletes have experienced. It is comforting to know that those who have come before me — Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Joe Montana and Jerry Rice, to name a few — have forever remained in the hearts of the fans, as I know I will too.

During my career as a Giant, so many people made significant impressions on my life. I’d like to thank all my past and current teammates. I’ve had the opportunity to play with some amazingly talented ballplayers who have treated me with respect, supported me and rooted for me throughout the years. Mike Murphy, our devoted Equipment Manager, used to baby-sit me as a little boy at Candlestick Park. There are no words to describe the love and respect I have for him. Mike Krukow and Duane Kuiper are the two best broadcasters in the business. Their professionalism, integrity and love for the game, puts them in a league of their own. I thank them for their support and I’m honored to call them friends. It is also important to thank all the men and women behind the scenes at the stadium who come to work every day and make it possible for us all to enjoy a day at the ballpark. I love walking to clubhouse hearing their “hellos” every day.

I would have loved nothing more than to retire as a Giant in the place where I call home and have shared so many momentous moments with all of you, but there is more baseball in me and I plan on continuing my career. My quest for a World Series ring continues.

Until next time,

Barry Bonds

After wiping off my monitor the drink that I spit on to it after uncontrollably laughing on the “Krukow and Kuiper being the two best broadcasters in the business” comment, I started thinking about this announcement, which wasn’t shocking, and…

You know, I hate Barry Bonds* more than any baseball player that’s ever walked on to a field. While I do think he’s one of the top 5 greatest players ever, I think he’s a lying, cheating asshole and hate him for the exact same reasons you guys probably hate him.

But, love him or hate him, he was damn good for the Dodgers vs. Giants rivalry and he was probably the only person that managed to keep the rivalry somewhat alive in recent years, Finley’s Grand Slam notwithstanding. Let’s face it, outside of Finley’s Grand Slam, there hasn’t really been a big moment in the rivalry since, what, 1997? The rivalry has lost a lot of its luster over the years and has mainly been running on its past glories, but he was one of the very few reasons it was able to remain interesting, with his antics, skill, records and, yeah, eventually, the cheating. Not that I’m praising that, hell no, but my point is, with being such a villain all these years, he managed to represent every single thing I hated in the Giants and his presence certainly made beating the Giants that much sweeter. I mean, even if the Giants swept us, I could at least take SOME solace if we managed to contain him and beat him personally. I suppose it’s part of being a Dodgers fan, as, along with growing up loving the Dodgers, I have also grown up hating the guy for being a Giant and, of course, the obvious reasons. Even when he’s old and in the twilight of his career at age 43, I still get the same solace and pleasure out of beating him. And that I’ll miss, because, outside of him, I really couldn’t give much of a shit about Pedro Feliz or whatever scrub playing on the team, today.

So, my message to you, Barry: it’s going to be weird not seeing you in a Giants uniform anymore. I hate your freaking guts, but you were damn good for the rivalry. And, look, I know you were upset about not being able to say goodbye to your fans in SF, but I tell you to think on the bright side. While you may have wished to retire as a Giant, with any hope and luck, perhaps, just perhaps, in the near future you’ll be able to don the orange and black once again…


What, you thought this article was going to be positive? I’ll leave the “being positive” stuff to Barry…

(rimshot!)

Vin vinscully-face.jpg

I Was Saying, "Boooooo-onds"

Gather ’round, friends. Sometimes the cosmic forces align in ways you never thought possible. Sometimes you get two utterly perfect situations, that joined together, create the perfect storm of irony. (Not like when it rains on your wedding day. That’s just bad f*%#ing luck.)

Via good friend of the site and pride of Ripley, TN, CeyHeyJay, we recieve the following gem from the LA Times:

Barry Bonds’ breaking or tying of Hank Aaron’s all-time home run record could fall on the same day that the Dodgers host a steroid awareness clinic.

I thank the Good Lord for this gift which has been bestowed upon us. This is like Michael Vick staging a pitbull fight only to find the Westminster Dog Show is next door. The possibilities here are endless.

This couldn’t be more perfect if I’d planned it myself.

Speaking of which, did the Dodgers plan this themselves?

The clinic was originally scheduled for June 29, when the Dodgers played the San Diego Padres. But the Taylor Hooton Foundation, which is running the clinic with the Dodgers, had to postpone the event. The late Taylor Hooton, a high school player whose 2003 suicide was tied to steroid use, is the cousin of former Dodgers pitcher Burt Hooton.

“This has nothing to do with who we’re playing,” Dodgers spokesman Josh Rawitch said. “It’s the date that was the best fit for us and the Hooton Foundation.” Dodgers outfielder Juan Pierre, hitting coach Bill Mueller and former outfielder Lou Johnson will participate in the clinic.

Sure, Josh. Total coincidence. I’m completely on board with that. Whatever you need to say to make this happen. Personally, I would have gone with “it’s a steroids awareness clinic. What better way to make kids aware of steroids than to watch someone who’s 94% steroids?”

On a somewhat related topic, Juan Pierre is the best they could get for an anti-steroids gathering? What’s he going to say? “Hey kids – don’t use steroids. I’ve never used steroids, and thanks to that I’ve been able bulk up all the way to 180 pounds and hit 12 home runs in over 4540 at bats! Oh – and don’t watch the game tonight, where the guy who did use steroids is going to break one of sports’ all time hallowed records. No. Don’t look there.”

Hmm. Maybe this isn’t such a good idea.